Fallacy Fridays: The One-Meaning Fallacy

Continuing our series on exegetical fallacies, it’s good to remind ourselves that a fallacy is an unsound or illogical interpretation of Scripture. These fallacies should serve us as helpful guidelines and can really strengthen our understanding Scripture in the...

Fallacy Fridays: Misuse of Subsequent Meaning

The first time I ever clearly understood what an exegetical fallacy was occurred when I was reading through some books by Gordon D. Fee. I was a young uneducated whipper snapper who had no idea what the word hermeneutics was nor of its importance. No, I just liked...

Fallacy Fridays: The Root Fallacy

Grant Osborne writes, “The root fallacy, a common error, assumes that the root of a term and its cognates carries a basic meaning that is reflected in every subordinate use of the word(s).” (The Hermeneutical Spiral, 84-85) I want to flesh out that...

Fallacy Fridays: The Lexical Fallacy

As I said last week, on Friday’s I’ll be posting a variety of fallacies related to exegesis and hermeneutics. This Friday’s fallacy is found in Grant R. Osborne’s The Hermeneutical Spiral – the lexical fallacy. Remember, a fallacy is a...

The Simplicity & Clarity of Scripture

Grant R. Osborne writes, “Luther (in The Bondage of the Will) proclaimed the basic clarity of Scripture in two areas: external clarity, which he called the grammatical aspect, attained by applying the laws of grammar (hermeneutical principles) to the text; and...

*NEW* – “Fallacy Fridays”

On Fridays I’m going to start posting a variety of exegetical, hermeneutical, or logical fallacies. There are a lot of good ones out there and I’ve had a lot of readers contact me in the past couple of years asking about different resources that deal with...

The Aesthetic Beauty of Scripture

“… when we interpret the Bible according to good hermeneutical principles, we will derive maximum benefit from our reading of the Bible.” Commenting on the fruit of good hermeneutics, Introduction to Biblical Interpretation notes nine areas that are...

George Whitefield’s Bible Study Method

“There he is at five in the morning . . . . on his knees with his English Bible, his Greek New Testament and Henry’s Commentary spread out before him. He reads a portion in the English, gains a fuller insight into it as he studies words and tenses in the Greek and...