My List of Top 10 Books on Charismatic Theology

December 15, 2011 | By | 32 Comments

There are a lot of books on spiritual gifts. The following ten books are my personal picks for the best books on what I’m calling “Charismatic Theology” – the perspective that sees the miraculous spiritual gifts as still continuing until Christ returns (healing, prophecy, tongues, interpretation of tongues, etc.). I’m working from least to greatest, from #10 to #1…

#10 – Empowered Evangelicals: Bringing Together the Best of the Evangelical and Charismatic Worlds, by Rich Nathan and Ken Wilson. This book is super influential within the Vineyard Movement and is well known by most Third Wave people. It’s quite practical and is easy to understand. My only complaint is that it is not nearly as fun to read as Jack Deere books nor as exegetically rigorous as Grudem or Carson. What it does have is a forward by J. I. Packer and a good deal of practical synthesis. In fact, I think it’s strength is in the area of theological reflection because it provides plenty of food for thought with how the local church should think through this issue. Plus, the title alone is gold.

#09 – The First Epistle to the Corinthians (NICNT), by Gordon D. Fee. This commentary covers the entire book of 1 Corinthians, so it isn’t as focused as Carson’s Showing the Spirit. However, the crucial texts related to the continuation of the charismatic experience are covered splendidly (e.g., 1 Cor. 13:10). The golden rule of “it can’t mean for us what it didn’t mean for Paul” is fleshed out well. Fee’s commentary is still considered to be one of the best commentaries on 1 Corinthians by many NT scholars. It also provides some excellent commentary on why 1 Cor. 1:4-8 is extremely important to the discussion regarding the continuation of the spiritual gifts.

#08 – The Gift of Prophecy in the New Testament and Today, by Wayne Grudem. As far as I’m concerned, this is the best book on prophecy available. It’s both scholarly and accessible, blending technical exegetical data with practical application. It really should be read by all who consider themselves “prophetic” and would provide a good foundation for many churches who allow for “prophetic” activity. Grudem’s thesis is simple: NT prophecy is spontaneous revelation that needs to be tested and OT prophets are replaced by NT apostles. In addition to a great amount of exegetical work, Grudem wisely provides much needed practical and pastoral wisdom throughout.

#07 – Perspectives on Pentecost, by Richard Gaffin. Okay, this recommendation might surprise you. Gaffin is a Cessationist, which means that he doesn’t believe the “miraculous” gifts have continued and is generally critical of charismatic theology. Yet it’s written so well! I love this book. Much of what Gaffin says is spot on. In fact, this is a great book as an introduction to the Holy Spirit and many of his criticisms of the charismatic movement are actually helpful for us to consider. I’m not convinced that his exegesis of the key texts (1 Cor. 12-14, Eph. 2:20, etc.) are correct, but I appreciate this book a lot. Much to agree with, and it’s helpful to understand the best of the opposing perspective.

#06 – God’s Empower Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Letters of Paul, by Gordon D. Fee. This is the standard for Pauline pneumatology, as far as I’m concerned. It is certainly not directly addressing the issue of Charismatic Theology, but it is so relevant it needs to be on this list. It will be a standard for decades to come, if not longer. Fee masterfully demonstrates how deep Paul’s understanding of and reliance upon the Spirit was. I was pleasantly surprised to find Fee also advocating that all Christians are baptized in the Spirit at conversation as well as suggesting that the common Pentecostal understanding of the interpretation of tongues is not a Pauline concept. There are literally thousands of conservative evangelicals that have Fee to thank for creating awareness of a “scholarly charismatic” category! This, in turn, renewed an interest from a large group of evangelicals to the possibility that the foundation for what was previously considered “pentecostal” or “charismatic” might also find relevance within conservative evangelicalism.

#05 – Are Miraculous Gifts for Today? Four Views, edited by Wayne Grudem w/ contributions by Richard B. Gaffin, Robert Saucy,  Sam Storms, and Doug Oss. I believe it’s important for us to evaluate, weigh, compare, and reflect on our theological views in relation to how they stand in comparison to opposing views. The wonderful thing about these Zondervan Counterpoint books is that it allows scholars to offer their best explanation of a theological view and gives other scholars a chance to evaluate it and respond. This is no different. Gaffin is a fantastic selection of the Cessationist view. Saucy adequately explains the “open but cautious” view that is prevalent in many evangelical churches. Sam Storms provides the Third Wave perspective and Doug Oss the Classic Pentecostal view. Each gets a chance to question and interact with each essay. It’s probably no surprise that I found Sam Storms’ essay (and responses) to be the best scholarly explanation of the Third Wave view. If you are interested in what I think about this subject, see Storms!

#04 – Signs, Wonders, and the Kingdom of God, by Don Williams. There are many reasons why this makes my top ten list. First of all, it is vintage Williams, which is to say that it is classic. It builds upon what I consider to be the most important framework for Charismatic Theology: the Kingdom of God. Williams popularizes what George Eldon Ladd wrote in his The Gospel of the Kingdom and The Presence of the Future in a way that points to why an “already, not yet” understanding of the kingdom is crucial to charismatics. I love this book because it powerfully connects theology to life and demonstrates convincingly the need for us to abandon our skepticism and seek to see the Spirit’s power at work now! If you don’t have a copy of this, you need to get it immediately. The only reason

#03 – Convergence: Spiritual Journeys of a Charismatic Calvinist, by Sam Storms. If you are Reformed and find yourself attracted to things related to exegesis and hermeneutics and systematic theology, you should read this book. Talk about box breaking! Sam Storms taught at Wheaton College, speaks regularly within conservative Reformed circles, is a specialist on Jonathan Edwards, and served in the Vineyard and at the Kansas City Int’l House of Prayer. If that doesn’t shatter your assumptions, I don’t know what will. This book is similar to Deere’s as it is fun to read and theological challenging. You’ll find plenty to stimulate you. I only wish more Calvinists would read Storms and seriously interact with his proposal. I love this book and couldn’t put it down.

#02 – Showing the Spirit: A Theological Exposition of 1 Cor. 12-14, by D. A. Carson. This is not really a popular level book as it is quite scholarly and full of footnotes. But I love it. Carson provides a synthesis of exegetical data and theological reflection that takes a Continuationist view. Throughout the work, Carson demonstrates that the idea that the gift of tongues “ceased” at the end of the 1st century and with the close of the NT Canon is simply indefensible from 1 Cor. 12-14. He also convinced me that the Pentecostal doctrine of a subsequent Baptism in the Spirit does not fit the NT data. It’s really a perfect blend of pointing out the exegetical flaws of hardline Cessationism and the abuses found within the charismatic movement.

#01 – Surprised by the Power of the Spirit, by Jack Deere. Deere was a professor at Dallas Theological Seminary and strongly opposed to Charismatic Theology. Throughout this book, Deere winsomely shares his story of how he went from hardline Cessationist to pastoring alongside John Wimber of the Vineyard. To me, this is still the best introduction to the subject and the most enjoyable to read. Deere’s exegesis is convincing and his transparency amazing. It is the standard intro to the subject and the first book I give to people who are exploring this subject.

Honorable mentions: The Charismatic Theology of St. Luke, by Roger Stronstad; The Beginner’s Guide to Spiritual Gifts, by Sam Storms; The Beginner’s Guide to the Gift of Prophecy, by Jack Deere; Naturally Supernatural, by Gary Best; Breakthrough: Discovering the Kingdom, by Derek Morphew; Surprised by the Voice of God, by Jack Deere; Power Healing, Power Evangelism, Everyone Gets to Play, Power Points, each by John Wimber; When the Spirit Comes with Power, by John White; The Quest for the Radical Middle, by Bill Jackson; Renewal Theology, by J. Rodman Williams; Systematic Theology, by Wayne Grudem; and Healing and Christianity, by Morton Kelsey.

Stay away from: everything written by Benny Hinn, Joel Osteen, and John MacArthur’s Charismatic Chaos. These works are a waste of your money.

Feel free to add your personal favorites!

Send to Kindle

Filed in: Charismatic Theology, The Kingdom of God, The Vineyard Movement | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

About the Author (Author Profile)

Luke Geraty has been married to Dawn for 12 years and they have four children, plus one on the way! For the past seven and a half years, he has served as the lead pastor of Trinity Christian Fellowship, a Vineyard Church. In his spare time, he prays, reads, blogs, writes, disciples, plays video games, drinks coffee, and eats sushi... but not simultaneously. Actually, that's not true. Luke is a multi-tasking extraordinaire who likes to juggle. Aside from leading in a local church, he is regularly involved in coaching and training leaders and providing support for local churches from a variety of traditions. He has earned a B.Th., M.Div. and is working on an MA through the University of Birmingham (UK) with the hopes of eventually completing a Ph.D. in some esoteric theological field... like ecclesiology in the rural church. Learn more about Luke here.
  • Christian Edmiston

    Deere’s follow-up, “Surprised by the Voice of God” is another excellent book on charismatic theology.  I see you put it into the “honorable mention” section.  I personally think Grudem’s book, while good, is only good when one is coming out of cessationism or “open but cautious”.  It is, I think “entry level” charismatic.  He doesn’t handle Ephesians 2:20 very well in my humble opinion.  Also, I think his thesis that NT apostles replace OT prophets has problems.  Jesus replaces the OT prophets (Hebrews 1:1,2). 

    I used to be a third-wave type, but I have since moved more toward a traditional charismatic view on Spirit baptism and more toward the Apostolic-Prophetic when it comes to the prophecy/prophetic ministry (with some modifications to account for my reformed views of course).

    What about Dennis and Rita Bennet’s “9 O’clock in the Morning” or “The Holy Spirit and You”?

  • http://www.facebook.com/SeanClue Sean Clue

    Luke you know you always get me going.
    10. Showing the Spirit – D.A Carson
    9. God’s empowering presence – Gordon Fee
    8. Voices of Pentecost – Vinson Synan ( not theological more biographical )
    7. The gift of prophecy – Wayne Grudem
    6. Sings and wonder – Gary Kinnaman
    5.Miracles and manifestations in the history of the church – Jeff Doles ( excellent! )
    4.Empowered Evangelicals – Rich Nathan ( a must for every Vineyardite)
    3.Surprised by the power of the Spirit _ Jack Deere
    2. Renewal theology – J. Rodman Williams
    1. Miracles are for today! – Troy Edwards ( the book I wished I wrote )

  • http://www.facebook.com/SeanClue Sean Clue

    Chriatian I feel the same about Grudems book, but a good read none the less

  • Christian Edmiston

    Here’s my list:10. Gift and Giver – Craig S. Keener
    9. The Gift of Prophecy – Wayne Grudem
    8. Showing the Spirit – D.A. Carson
    7. Beginner’s Guide to the Gift of Prophecy – Jack Deere
    6. Power Evangelism – John Wimber
    5. Convergence – Sam Storms
    4. Beginner’s Guide to Spiritual Gifts – Sam Stomrs
    3. The Word and Power Church – Douglas Banister
    2. Surprised by the Voice of God – Jack Deere
    1. Surprised by the Power of the Spirit – Jack Deere 

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    My “problem” with Deere’s second book was that it was HEAVY on story, whereas his first book had such an exegetical thrust that it literally changed my theological grid for understanding the spiritual gifts (and I was already a “charismatic”!). It’s still good though…

    Personally I find it hard to call Grudem “entry level” for charismatics… it is a bit more “popular” than his doctoral dissertation, but far from “entry level.” The “Beginner’s guides” would fall into that category, I think. After all, they are written to that popular reader level. That being said, I agree that it’s main focus is towards the Cessationist and “open but cautious” group, so we are in agreement there! :)

    I am most certainly Third Wave and quite convinced that Spirit baptism occurs at conversion… as well as convinced that the OT Prophet to NT Apostle connection fits the data best, though it’s not flawless, as you note. That Jesus is the fulfillment of the OT prophet role does not mutually exclude that the NT prophets stepped into that “authority” type of role… does it?

    Ephesians 2:20 is certainly a problematic verse in everyone’s system, except the Cessationist…. until a second reading is made! ha ha ha!

    I haven’t really read all of Bennet’s stuff… I own them, but haven’t ever finished them. Which is probably “charismatic blasphemy” – ha ha!

    But those are my opinions, and I’m grateful for yours!

    I equally think that some of the differences between Pentecostals and Charismatics and Third Wave folks tend to be more due to semantics.

    So what do you think about Fee?!?!?!

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    I TOTALLY FORGOT ABOUT KEENER!

    Great addition. I might have to amend my post…  :)

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    Gary Kinnaman’s book… I don’t know if I have that…

    Give me an overview!

  • http://www.facebook.com/SeanClue Sean Clue

    Forgot about Wimber, my bad. Also Banister

  • http://www.facebook.com/SeanClue Sean Clue

    Luke the second book by Deere had alot of stories intentionally put in, as I heard him say too many of us have the theology but not the practical application and so the stories was to further wet our appetite as it did mine.

    Third wave for the most part do believe in Spirit baptism at conversion, but also emphasize some kind of jump start activation, that part is unclear but we see in Wimbers practise regular activation seminars which we need again either in home groups or seminars.

  • http://www.facebook.com/SeanClue Sean Clue

    Taking a look at it on my shelf now, but it’s an excellent read, not in print at the moment…. will give you more shortly.

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    I don’t doubt it was intentional. I am simply saying I didn’t like it as much :) The first was the perfect blend.

    Plus, not a fan of Paul Cain… ha ha.

    I agree about practical and application being important though!

  • Christian Edmiston

    Okay so maybe it’s unfair to call Grudem’s book on prophecy “entry level”.  My main point is that while it is certainly exegetical and practical, it has limitations and theological difficulties.  For example, the OT Prophet/NT Apostle view is partly based on the cessation of the apostolic office, a doubtful doctrine in my view (see Ephesians 4:11-16).  Secondly, I would argue that even if the NT (original) Apostles fulfilled the OT Prophetic role, they do so no more or less than all believers.  All Christians are given the prophetic Spirit (Acts 2:15-21).  That doesn’t necessarily take away from the uniqueness of the Twelve, but it would take more space to go into that.  Maybe I’ll blog about it sometime.  ;-)

    On a more practical note, one of my main frustrations with some in the Third Wave broadly speaking and the Reformed Charismatic movement, is that we have relied on Grudem and Storms so much (though these two are still giants in my view), that we’re not learning about prophecy and the prophetic ministry from Prophets.  We should look to men like Mike Bickle, John Paul Jackson, Graham Cooke, and R. Loren Sandford (a personal favorite of mine) among others in the area of Prophetic ministry.

    Ministries like Toronto Airport Christian Fellowship, MorningStar, and Bethel are not the best exegetes (and in my view the Reformation may have had even more baggage than these movements), but they know the prophetic ministry and the moving of the Spirit.  I am as reformed now as I ever have been, but when it comes to learing how to “do the stuff”, I need Vineyard, Toronto, Bethel, and to a lesser extent, IHOP.  It can be frustrating with all their theological naivete (and trust me, you will never find me anywhere near Perry Stone,  Benny Hinn, or Peter Wagner), but I feel that I need those who are better at this than I am to help me grow in this area.

    As always Luke, stimulating discussion.  I really do thank God for your gifting, knowledge, experience, and most of all, your friendship.  Thanks for letting me get on my soapbox for a while.

  • Seclue

    Got you, but I know you look beyond, just as I look beyond Piper and some of his extreme teaching on poverty.

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    What is extreme in Piper’s teaching on poverty? I don’t listen to Piper enough to understand his basic “thinking.” I’ve read many of his books though… and maybe didn’t see those?

    Got any links? I know what you mean about sometimes people almost teaching that you should be poor in order to please God, etc.

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    the OT Prophet/NT Apostle view is partly
    based on the cessation of the apostolic office, a doubtful doctrine in my view
    (see Ephesians 4:11-16).  Secondly, I would argue that even if the NT
    (original) Apostles fulfilled the OT Prophetic role, they do so no more or less
    than all believers.  All Christians are given the prophetic Spirit (Acts
    2:15-21).  That doesn’t necessarily take away from the uniqueness of the
    Twelve, but it would take more space to go into that.  Maybe I’ll blog
    about it sometime.  ;-)

    I would enjoy to read your blog on this. Maybe you could do a series on it…
    and it would be awesome if you did it here at ThinkTheology :)

    I have a hard time with the apostle issue because I think many of the
    discussions around the issue tend to overlook the fact that there were
    different types of apostles in the NT. I think the
    distinctions between the different apostles is important to make and I also
    think that a discussion on the subject has to include the
    acknowledgement that Rom. 16:7′s “Junia” is important to the
    discussion (which brings up the gender roles issue too…).

    Because the word “apostle” carries so much baggage, I’m hesitant
    about its usage. I’m more comfortable with the word “apostolic,” especially
    for those who are missionary/pioneer types. But at the end of the day I’m just
    not as convinced of the continuation of the office of apostle nor of Ephesians
    4:11′s intention of communicating that the apostle office
    would continue in such a manner as new apostles always
    existing. It’s certainly a possible reading of the text, and I 2:20 and 3:5
    clearly draw a connection between these two offices… need to think more about
    it. Grudem’s proposal is simply an option of the text, not a necessary one as
    far as I’m concerned…

    That being said, while I lean heavier towards the “cessation”
    of the apostolic office, I’m not a hardliner. I have worked alongside people
    who are cool with modern day apostles and our church actually had one when I
    first started passing… J

    On a more practical note, one of my main frustrations with
    some in the Third Wave broadly speaking and the Reformed Charismatic movement,
    is that we have relied on Grudem and Storms so much (though these two are still
    giants in my view), that we’re not learning about prophecy and the prophetic
    ministry from Prophets.  We should look to men like Mike Bickle, John Paul
    Jackson, Graham Cooke, and R. Loren Sandford (a personal favorite of mine)
    among others in the area of Prophetic ministry.

    I wonder if some of this has to do with our backgrounds? I’m sure it has
    something to do with mine. As you know, I grew up in the Vineyard scene as well
    as other charismatic churches and the Assemblies of God, so I’ve been around
    plenty of prophets and prophetesses and healers and all of that. I also spent a
    number of years in the IHOP scene as I was on staff at an IHOP. I got PLENTY of
    exposure to Bickle, Johnson, Cain, Rick Joyner, Bob Jones, James Goll, etc. I was
    surrounded by that type of stuff all the time. Some of
    that time was good for me and I’m sure I learned a lot of great stuff. Yet I
    also saw some really bad stuff and noticed that the foundation being laid for
    those seeking to grow in the prophetic was not good. In
    many ways it was destructive to the very gospel that I have come to love and
    proclaim!

    I’m sure some of that was based on immaturity and lack of experience… but I
    truly believe that if you want to get a church functioning
    biblically, you have to get them thinking biblically.
    Obviously that can be taken too far, so I’m not proposing biblicism. Yet for
    me, Grudem’s work would be foundational for a prophetic team and is my
    “required reading” on the topic. From there, Bickle’s
    Growing in the Prophetic and books by Cooke (whom I also
    enjoy) and things taught by Johnson or any of the other “prophet” people can be
    better evaluated.

    I guess part of me is just writing from the perspective of
    being a pastor and having been in the
    ultra-charismatic-IHOP-prophecy-prayer-worship circles and seeing how some of
    the underlying theological assumptions can really damage some important doctrines
    and some important practices! Testing prophecy, for
    example, is just a concept that is given lip service… especially when
    prophecies are given by “names” of “proven” prophets. This is fundamentally in opposition
    to what I think is helpful for the church and leads to many other serious
    problems.

    So part of me wants to say, “Yeah, there’s some great stuff
    to be had in the IHOP and Brownsville and Bethel circles,” but another part of
    me believes that real and valid prophetic ministry and healing can be
    experienced in an environment that is rigorously tied to the text of Scripture
    and doctrinally reflective. It has to be true…. and if we haven’t come to
    experience it now… let’s keep trying to shoot for it!

    So I’m with you, and yet I’m cautious about opening some of
    the doors because I think the pastor inside of me has seen some of that “allow
    the crazies to help get us jump started” just ends up causing more problems in
    the end… and yet I also am with you (ha ha ha ha). Oh boy…

    As always Luke, stimulating
    discussion.  I really do thank God for your gifting, knowledge,
    experience, and most of all, your friendship.  Thanks for letting me get
    on my soapbox for a while.

    Ditto! I will never forget sitting at a restaurant with you
    (enjoying some of the finer things in life) and thinking, “I have actually met
    another living Reformed Charismatic person. Wow.”

    This discussion is stimulating a lot on my part… so please
    keep pushing! Keep prodding! Keep helping me grow…

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    Christian said: “… the OT Prophet/NT Apostle view is partly based on the cessation of the apostolic office, a doubtful doctrine in my view (see Ephesians 4:11-16). Secondly, I would argue that even if the NT (original) Apostles fulfilled the OT Prophetic role, they do so no more or less than all believers. All Christians are given the prophetic Spirit (Acts 2:15-21). That doesn’t necessarily take away from the uniqueness of the Twelve, but it would take more space to go into that. Maybe I’ll blog about it sometime. ;-)”

    I would enjoy to read your blog on this. Maybe you could do a series on it… and it would be awesome if you did it here at ThinkTheology :)

    I have a hard time with the apostle issue because I think many of the discussions around the issue tend to overlook the fact that there were different types of apostles in the NT. I think the distinctions between the different apostles is important to make and I also think that a discussion on the subject has to include the acknowledgement that Rom. 16:7′s “Junia” is important to the discussion (which brings up the gender roles issue too…).

    Because the word “apostle” carries so much baggage, I’m hesitant about its usage. I’m more comfortable with the word “apostolic,” especially for those who are missionary/pioneer types. But at the end of the day I’m just not as convinced of the continuation of the office of apostle nor of Ephesians 4:11′s intention of communicating that the apostle office would continue in such a manner as new apostles always existing. It’s certainly a possible reading of the text, and I 2:20 and 3:5 clearly draw a connection between these two offices… need to think more about it. Grudem’s proposal is simply an option of the text, not a necessary one as far as I’m concerned…

    That being said, while I lean heavier towards the “cessation” of the apostolic office, I’m not a hardliner. I have worked alongside people who are cool with modern day apostles and our church actually had one when I first started pastoring… :)

    Christian said: “On a more practical note, one of my main frustrations with some in the Third Wave broadly speaking and the Reformed Charismatic movement, is that we have relied on Grudem and Storms so much (though these two are still giants in my view), that we’re not learning about prophecy and the prophetic ministry from Prophets. We should look to men like Mike Bickle, John Paul Jackson, Graham Cooke, and R. Loren Sandford (a personal favorite of mine) among others in the area of Prophetic ministry.”

    I wonder if some of this has to do with our backgrounds? I’m sure it has something to do with mine. As you know, I grew up in the Vineyard scene as well as other charismatic churches and the Assemblies of God, so I’ve been around plenty of prophets and prophetesses and healers and all of that. I also spent a number of years in the IHOP scene as I was on staff at an IHOP. I got PLENTY of exposure to Bickle, Johnson, Cain, Rick Joyner, Bob Jones, James Goll, etc. I was surrounded by that type of stuff all the time. Some of that time was good for me and I’m sure I learned a lot of great stuff. Yet I also saw some really bad stuff and noticed that the foundation being laid for those seeking to grow in the prophetic was not good. In many ways it was destructive to the very gospel that I have come to love and proclaim!

    I’m sure some of that was based on immaturity and lack of experience… but I truly believe that if you want to get a church functioning biblically, you have to get them thinking biblically. Obviously that can be taken too far, so I’m not proposing biblicism. Yet for me, Grudem’s work would be foundational for a prophetic team and is my “required reading” on the topic. From there, Bickle’s Growing in the Prophetic and books by Cooke (whom I also enjoy) and things taught by Johnson or any of the other “prophet” people can be better evaluated.

    I guess part of me is just writing from the perspective of being a pastor and having been in the ultra-charismatic-IHOP-prophecy-prayer-worship circles and seeing how some of the underlying theological assumptions can really damage some important doctrines and some important practices! Testing prophecy, for example, is just a concept that is given lip service… especially when prophecies are given by “names” of “proven” prophets. This is fundamentally in opposition to what I think is helpful for the church and leads to many other serious problems.

    So part of me wants to say, “Yeah, there’s some great stuff to be had in the IHOP and Brownsville and Bethel circles,” but another part of me believes that real and valid prophetic ministry and healing can be experienced in an environment that is rigorously tied to the text of Scripture and doctrinally reflective. It has to be true…. and if we haven’t come to experience it now… let’s keep trying to shoot for it!

    So I’m with you, and yet I’m cautious about opening some of the doors because I think the pastor inside of me has seen some of that “allow the crazies to help get us jump started” just ends up causing more problems in the end… and yet I also am with you (ha ha ha ha). Oh boy…

    Christian said: “As always Luke, stimulating discussion. I really do thank God for your gifting, knowledge, experience, and most of all, your friendship. Thanks for letting me get on my soapbox for a while.”

    Ditto! I will never forget sitting at a restaurant with you (enjoying some of the finer things in life) and thinking, “I have actually met another living Reformed Charismatic person. Wow.”

    This discussion is stimulating a lot on my part… so please keep pushing! Keep prodding! Keep helping me grow…

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    I decided to respond below so that this stupid post didn’t get too narrow :)

  • Christian Edmiston

    I forgot, another good book on charismatic theology is “Charisma Vs. Charismania” by Chuck Smith.  Probably the only Calvary Chapel publication that I would ever recommend.

  • http://www.thinktheology.org Luke Geraty

    Wait, you won’t recommend stuff by George Bryson or Dave Hunt?
    ;)

  • Christian Edmiston

    Wait, let me think about it………….no. Lol.

  • judestjohn

    I have read 1, 2, 3, 5, and 8 from the list above and several of the honourable mentions. I would put Are Miraculous Gifts for Today at the top of my list but have no qualms about your top 3 being there either.

    I think the next one from the list that you give that I would/should read is Fee’s commentary.

  • http://ourheavenlyearth.wordpress.com/ Troy

    Jon Ruthven’s On the Cessation of the Charismata should be on that list!!

  • Joshua Hopping

    I would add James K.A. Smith’s book “Thinking in Tongues: Pentecostal Contributions to Christian Philosophy” to this list. It is a wonderful book that looks at how speaking in tongues shapes our minds, theology and lives.

  • Pingback: Strange Fire: John MacArthur claims no good has come out of the Charismatic Movement

  • cwoznicki

    I would add James K.A. Smith’s book “Thinking in Tongues”

  • cris

    How about Joy Unspeakable by Martyn Lloyd Jones

  • Pingback: Strange Fire Turns Toward Strained Polemics | Think Theology

  • http://ourheavenlyearth.wordpress.com/ Troy

    Jon Ruthven’s On the Cessation of the Charismata should be on that list!!

  • Daniel King

    I would add Howard Ervin’s book: Spirit Baptism, a Biblical Investigation. He was a professor at ORU and rumor is that he actually coined the term “charismatic” back in the 60′s. It is an academic read, but good for understanding what Charismatics believe about the infilling of the Holy Spirit.

  • danieljf

    I was a student of Roger Stronstad. And a former fan and follower of Hanegraff and MacArther. Now I am a happy Charismatic pastor. I have heard it all before from these guys. I was one of them. I remember the feeling of how easy it was to cast judgement and generalization on charismatics. As I reflect it was an angry spirit that we embraced. We felt threatened by the Pentecostals and vilified them through fear. Then I saw a miracle or two …and its really the goodness of divine healing and the goodness of miracles that brought me to be suspect of the ‘apologetics and polemics’ motivations.

  • Pingback: How the #StrangeFire conference confirms my continuationism | Violet Nesdoly

  • Pingback: Now THAT’s a Good Question! | Intentional Pastoring